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Tag Archives: Ciudad Juárez

Mexico- why is Ciudad Juarez the most dangerous city?

Map showing the Rio Grande drainage basin.
Map showing the Rio Grande drainage basin. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The authorities of the State of Chihuahua and Ciudad Juarez say it is not the world’s most violent city

The authorities of the State of Chihuahua and Ciudad Juarez say it is not the most violent city in the world. That honor now falls to San Pedro Sula, Honduras, or in some areas of Rio or Caracas, who knows. The killings have gone from over 3,000 in 2010 to 2,000 last year and the trend continues downward. A new governor, the presence of federal police in the past year and a half billions of federal government investment and the mobilization of its people have contributed.

However, local journalists attribute the drop in the number of homicides to a very simple reason: the Sinaloa cartel, headed by Joaquin, El Chapo Guzman, has imposed on the remnants of the Juarez cartel, which was founded 20 years ago by Armando Carrillo Fuentes, the Lord of Heaven, named for the air fleet which came to move cocaine to the U.S..

But what happened to the city of tame Indians met by the Spanish Franciscans, the liberals of Benito Juarez, the Apaches of the skirmishes, and raids of Pancho Villa became the turn of the century in the capital world of crime?

Ciudad Juarez is impressive it has a special vibe as the Mexicans say. A vast expanse of flat land urbanized until the eye with buildings that do not exceed two floors. West and north the limit and the border mountains on the south, the desert. On the dusty streets, not always paved and poorly lit, rusting cars without number plates, stunning Suburban or Explorer trucks tinted windows and pickups of police patrols. Do not walk on them handsome and tough like Benicio del Toro and talking softly with his eyes closed, but teens fucking dwarf, poor and probably armed. Actually no walks. Juarez does not invite the stranger nothing, puts to the test.

It is the great backyard of El Paso, Texas, paradoxically, the most peaceful city in the U.S… On this side separates the Rio Grande, because once had floods and floods, and is now a dry moat. On the other, the Rio Grande is green and channeled peers. Three bridges cross the international office, where thousands of vehicles take more than hour and a half to travel to a crawl just 500 meters. In the main, before arriving at the poster you like “Bon Voyage”, a cross on a pink background and a small sign at the bottom that says “No More!” Reminiscent of the more than 1,200 women killed, shot, raped, tortured, beheaded and dismembered in the last 20 years.

City border and femicide, was a woman, Ignacia Jasso, the Nacha, which began in the late twenties of last century smuggling drugs north. Marijuana and heroin flowed naturally to the hearts of the soldiers gringos. La Nacha, with the help of his man, Pablote, a couple of legend, he mastered the business without serious mishaps over 50 years.

Juarez then began to change. In the mid-sixties came the maquilas, the factories of components that dominate half of the territory, today converted into a symbol of labor exploitation. Men and women, especially women, in southern Chihuahua found work in them.

The new and the old smuggling industry filled the pockets of the city, but there was still worse to come.

The signing of the FTA with the U.S. in 1993, born the same year as the Juarez cartel, another paradox was much bigger business. Flashes of this unlikely Eldorado came to southern Mexico. Thousands of women traveled there in search of jobs they had lost in the field. The city received 100,000 new residents a year, the population doubled in a decade to almost a million and a half now, as fast growing real estate speculation. But only awaited the mob, not of course public services. They found a swamp of impunity in which criminals and corrupt police officials imposed by law. There were many weapons, drugs and money. Killing was very easy and almost impossible to be punished for. It was born a Factory of crime as his indispensable book titled journalist Sandra Rodriguez. Homicides increased from year to year from 55 to 120.

Thousands of gang members, i.e., “who at the age of 17,” wrote Magda as Coss Nogueda in Arms trafficking in Mexico, “have already chosen which song they want to be buried”, became killers. Came the Aztecs, the Mexicles, assassins Murderers, named for their origin graffiti, and Line, the group of agents working for the cartel.

And here came Chapo. From 2007 and especially 2008 the Sinaloa cartel began to dispute the Juarez plaza. Murderers for hire were recruited, as armed guards who divided, bribed and threatened his opponents, public officials and infiltrated the police as part of organized crime.

A wave of betrayal and revenge spread through the city, the settling of scores made some months exceeded the 200 murders. The drug war would leave thousands of dead and missing in the streets in mass graves in the desert. Now, that wheel of death begins to stop. The sun begins to set on the big stage of the crime.

 
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Posted by on 05/11/2012 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

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CIUDAD JUAREZ – Hitmen change of tactics, are now using bicycles

The unidentified man was attacked by a gunman, who came on a bicycle and shot him in the back

CIUDAD JUAREZ - Hitmen change of tactics, are now using bicycles
CIUDAD JUAREZ – Hitmen change of tactics, are now using bicycles

A gunman that killed a man in Ciudad Juarez, used a bicycle to go to his victim and flee easily, within a wave of violence that left Sunday for a total of seven dead in this border and the state capital.

Witnesses said one of these killings to the police that the gunman was riding on a bicycle, which got close to the victim when washing his vehicle, then fled quietly, going unnoticed by the police, who searched for a gunman on board a car running at high speed.

The police report indicates that about 15:00 on Sunday, a man about 30 years old was shot while washing his truck in a car-wash at the intersection of Avenida Panamericana and Rye.

The unidentified man was attacked by a gunman, who was riding on a bicycle and shot him in the back. While the victim tried to run, he was killed a few yards from his truck.

At the same border an hour earlier, two men were executed and their bodies dumped on the peripheral Camino Real.

Another person was executed in the streets of Graphite and Acacias, where gunmen dropped the body of a cholo looking man, aged approximately between 30 and 35. Another was executed in the colony Farmer.

Just this past Sunday, at the state capital, two people were executed in the intersection of Ninth and JJ Calvo, of the Santa Rosa. Another was in serious injuries.

 
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Posted by on 05/08/2012 in Crime!

 

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In one year we have found 22 bodies of adolescents in Juarez reports AGO

In one year we have found 22 bodies of adolescents in Juarez
In one year we have found 22 bodies of adolescents in Juarez

In one year we have found 22 bodies of adolescents in Juarez

In a most confidential manner, the Attorney General’s Office yesterday  returned the remains of Perla Ivonne Gonzalez Aguirre

CIUDAD JUAREZ, April 22. – With the return of the remains of a young adolescent, found in the Sierra del Valle de Juarez, where the total dead mounts to 22 teenagers who went missing during the last 12 months, confirmed the Attorney General of Chihuahua.

In a most confidential manner, the Attorney General (FGE) held yesterday the delivery of the remains of Perla Ivonne Gonzalez Aguirre.

This is a 15 year old, who disappeared on July 20, 2009 in the center of the city, and was found dead in late January in the Juarez Valley.

It was only until Thursday when he informed the mother Elvira Gonzalez Cowgirl, their DNA tests matched those of the girl.

“All moms demand justice, not impunity, these murders, because they are not worth much hurting mother. Where are the murderers? I want them to deliver them their daughters alive, “he exclaimed.

 
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Posted by on 04/23/2012 in Abused Children, Crime!

 

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Is CIUDAD JUAREZ, CHIHUAHUA the most dangerous city in the world?

Hector Murguia responded to the assertion of U.S. drug czar

El Paso and Juarez

El Paso and Juarez (Photo credit: dherrera_96)

CIUDAD JUAREZ, CHIHUAHUA (29/MAR/2012). – The mayor of Ciudad Juarez, Hector Murguia, today rejected that this Mexican border city is the most dangerous in the world as the undersecretary of state for the U.S. war on drugs William Brownfield.

“We are not the most dangerous city in the world from Mexico and we can verify it,” Murguia said in a press conference. Ciudad Juárez “is now the most dangerous city in Mexico and I think the most dangerous in America, if not the world, “Brownfield said Thursday at a hearing in the House of Representatives of the United States.

The U.S. official responded that way to a congressman’s question regarding the case of five police shot dead the Wednesday in Ciudad Juarez in an attack by suspected assassins.

The mayor of Juarez said that according to their records, in January this year there were 116 homicides in the city, 69 February and 69 March, while in the same months of last year the figures were 269, 173 and 268, respectively. Murguia called the U.S. official’s statements “irresponsible” because it “scare is affecting tourism and progress in security so far.”

Also, the mayor invited Brownfield to visit Ciudad Juarez “to find that is a community that seeks to get ahead, despite his remarks.”

On the evening of Thursday, the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City issued a statement that applauded and expressed support for “efforts of the Government of Mexico and the state of Chihuahua and Ciudad Juarez, to solve the cartel-related violence”.

“The impact of these efforts can be reflected in the crime statistics of the city, showing a significant reduction in the number of homicides, “he said. He said that “U.S. assistance, in coordination with our Mexican counterparts, has focused on police training and equipment to provide enhanced capabilities to combat the threat represent transnational criminal organizations.”

The embassy said that while bilateral efforts under the Merida Initiative security cooperation changing focus of the federal police to the state, “the state of Chihuahua and Ciudad Juarez have become key priorities. “

 “We will continue to support, particularly in the areas most affected by crime and violence, in partnership with the Government of Mexico, its agencies and its citizen’s safe,” the statement said.

In 2011, Ciudad Juarez remained as the most violent city in Mexico with nearly two thousand murders, but was a figure lower than the levels recorded in 2010 when there were three thousand 100 homicides.

According to a recent report by the NGO Citizen Council for Public Safety and Criminal Justice the Honduras San Pedro Sula has moved to Ciudad Juarez as the most violent city in the world.

 
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Posted by on 03/30/2012 in Crime!, Politics

 

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the negative impact of the “drug war” on the border communities!

Another forum of talk; where is the action? Who will take the first step?

the negative impact of the "drug war"

the negative impact of the "drug war"

Los Angeles, A forum held today at the California State University Northridge (CSUN) addressed the negative impact of the “drug war” in the communities along the border between the U.S. and Mexico.The event entitled “Mexican exiles and the First Amendment” met a lawyer who specializes in political asylum cases of Mexicans and Mexican activist civil rights advocate, currently in exile in USA, who witnessed the impact of violence on the southern border.

The civil rights activist Saul Reyes Salazar explained the difficulties faced by many of its citizens and said that the early days in El Paso, Texas, where he now lives with his wife and children after receiving asylum, were the first in a time “where I could sleep through the night without having nightmares”

The activist claimed that the inhabitants of cities such as Ciudad Juarez, where he resided, and other Mexican cities bordering the U.S. – are suffering in the midst of the struggle between drug traffickers and the army and police of Mexico.

Reyes Salazar not only criticized the drug violence but also the military actions of the Mexican police and innocent people, which is becoming “collateral damage” of war.

In Guadeloupe, a small village near Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua state, the activist was 180 dead, 26 missing and eight unidentified bodies that were left stranded.

His family began receiving threats when he began to criticize the violence and the militarization of the city. And not only threats: six members of his family have been killed since 2008, why we asked for political asylum.

For immigration lawyer Carlos Spector, experience helping victims of violence also has been impressive. He explained that 21 activists of the civil rights defenders have been killed in the state of Chihuahua since joining the army in 2008.

“The Mexican border communities are terrorized by drug cartels, police and Mexican army and an economic model designed to destroy their economic survival,” noted José Luis Benavides, head of the journalism department at CSUN.

 
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Posted by on 03/16/2012 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

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laws against femicide; the killing of women because of gender

English: Emblem of the United Nations. Color i...

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Currently, there are 10 states in the country which have laws against femicide; the killing of women because of genderUNITED NATIONS, March 2. – 2012 could be established as the year for legislation against femicide in the laws of the 32 states of Mexico, real progress in reducing violence against the female population, as estimated today by the National Institute for Women (NIW.)

“We hope this (is) year. The goal is that this year we have legislated femicide (killing of women based on gender,) in all states of the country, “said the president of Inmujeres, Rocio Garcia Gaytan, after attending the Commission on the Status of Women in the UN, which began this week and will close on March 9.

She explained that such laws are to be responsible for punishing the femicides, local law enforcement crimes, regardless of the progress of federal legislation in this area already approved in the House of Representatives and the Senate revised.

Currently, there are 10 states in the country which have laws against femicide the killing of women based on gender, though each state has focused its efforts in a particular way.

Garcia Gaytan highlighted the case of Chihuahua, Ciudad Juarez, where cundieron femicides in the 90′s, where local law does not contemplate this crime in itself but increases the penalties for the murders of women.

The official acknowledged why need progress on the “harmonization of laws’” to the definition of femicide, as well as “the approval of administrative records” of the crimes committed against women.

Improve the criteria needed to catalog the crimes against women, because the records do not include causes, ages and circumstances of the crimes, making it impossible to determine accurately the number of femicides in Mexico, he said.

He said that information given to a civil partnership by government officials in Nuevo Leon, for example, considered femicides death of 50 women in the fire of Casino Royale, an incident which is not classified as a homicide by gender.

“We have much work in this area, but whenever there is a case of high-profile femicide increased social pressure to move forward,” said Garcia Gaytan.

During his participation in the Commission on the Status of Women UN, the official also shared the progress made by Mexico in the SUM program, which aims to increase participation of women in politics.

The project, whose training has already benefited four thousand women in 14 states of Mexico, is one of 10 UN-sponsored by Women in the world for his relevance

The goal is for a period of three years, to double the number of halls in Mexico ruled by women, and inclusion of local parliaments to ensure that female state legislators are representing at least 30 percent of the congresses.

 
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Posted by on 03/03/2012 in Abused Women, Crime!

 

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Juárez rivals the world for being the most dangerous city

Crosses erected as a monument to victims of th...
Image via Wikipedia

The murder rate in Juárez rivals the most dangerous cities in the world and is more typical of regions where government has collapsed, an expert on homicides said.

The violence continued during the weekend, including a shootout involving the Mexican army that resulted in the arrest of three women and five men suspected in killings, extortion and arsons in the Valley of Juárez.

More than 5,300 people have been slain in the Juárez area since the start of a war between the Sinaloa and Juárez drug cartels in 2008.

There have been at least 15 homicides since Friday and more than 1,100 homicides this year alone in Juárez. By comparison, there has been one homicide in El Paso this year.

Historically, Juárez is not as deadly as Medellin during the peak of the drug cartel bloodshed in that Colombian city in the early 1990s.

At its worst, Medellin had a homicide rate of 250 per 100,000 residents, while Juárez last year had a rate of 191, according to the public safety organization Consejo Ciudadano para la Seguridad Publica y Justicia Penal (Citizen’s Council for Public Security and Penal Justice).

Medellin, which has 1 million more residents than Juárez, is arguably considered the most violent city of the past three decades.

“Juárez deserves the title of most dangerous city in the world not only for its homicide rate but also suffering very high numbers of other violent crimes,” the organization stated in a report last January.

The council reported Juárez last year had higher homicide rates than San Pedro Sula, Honduras, (119 per 100,000); San Salvador, El Salvador (95), and Caracas, Venezuela (94).

A CNN report last April listed Juárez in no particular order among the most dangerous cities in the world, including Karachi, Pakistan; Beirut, Lebanon; and Cape Town, South Africa.

The number of murders in Juárez is more typical of regions during a civil war, a revolution or other form of a state breakdown, said Randolph Roth, a historian who studies homicides.

“Whenever you have a real struggle for power — civil wars, revolutions — organized gangs can get very, very bad like you have in Juárez today,” Roth said. “It’s very rare to see the rates like this in a developed country. It’s very sad.”

Roth is a professor of history and sociology at Ohio State University who created a historical database examining U.S. homicide rates from different time periods and places. He is author of the book “American Homicide.”

Roth said the worst period for homicides in the U.S. was during Reconstruction in the Red River Valley of Louisiana, which had a murder rate of at least 196 per 100,000 per year from 1866 to 1876.

“You had the former Confederates. And the Ku Klux Klan were just in rebellion against the government,” Roth explained. “You didn’t have a central government.”

Mexico and Juárez government officials and El Paso economic development leaders have repeatedly said that authority has not broken down in Juárez despite the bloodshed. Government services continue. Businesses still do business. And the maquiladora industry is humming along.

A report by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime stated that a lot of attention has been placed on Juárez but that high homicides rates can be found along cocaine smuggling corridors in the Americas.

“Less attention has been placed on Central America, where the murder rates are four to five times higher than in Mexico, and where both the economy and the state are far less robust and resilient,” the report stated.

“While the drug violence has been intense in places like Ciudad Juárez, Mexico‘s overall murder rate remains moderate compared too many other countries afflicted by the drug trade.”

The report, “Crime and Instability. Case studies of transnational threats,” was issued in February. It also stated that much of the violence in Central America is not drug related but due to a legacy of social division and decades of civil war.

The Mexican government has deployed thousands of federal police and soldiers to Juárez but the violence has continued and most murders remain unsolved.

Mexican President Felipe Calderón this year also launched the program “Todos Somos Juárez” (We are all Juárez) intended to rebuild the city’s social fabric with education, sports, jobs and culture and other proposals.

Roth said law enforcement can only do so much to stem murders.

Roth advocates an uncommon theory, arguing that high murder rates are not linked to poverty, lack of police or gun control, but rather to trust in government and a sense of belonging.

“People settle their own scores when the state breaks down,” Roth said in a telephone interview from Ohio. “They think there will be no consequences. So, they act like there will be no consequences.”

Roth points to the Great Depression as an example of when homicides dropped while poverty increased because there was a sense of we are all in it together. In communities where there is no sense of kinship, the smallest slight can escalate to violence, he said.

Roth argued there is no correlation, beyond a certain point, between police staffing numbers and murders.

“Strong policing can deter auto theft rings, burglaries and gang violence but it has a hard time with murder because it is so spontaneous. It is so personal and the emotions involved so strong,” he said.

But if trust is the answer, it can be a difficult answer to find in a city like Juárez, infected for decades by corruption.

A public opinion poll last November by the Autonomous University of Ciudad Juárez showed that 97 percent of the population felt unsafe and that 52 percent disapproved of and distrusted all Mexican authorities.

“Ultimately what builds a sense of patriotism and fellowship is feeling a sense of connectiveness with your neighbor (and) that your government does care for your concerns and builds stability,” Roth said.

“It’s easier to revive an economy than build trust. (Government action) has to be seen as effective. It’s deeper (than just the government). It has to come from the people itself.”

 
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Posted by on 03/01/2012 in Crime!, Politics

 

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