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Shattered Dreams a UFUN Folly!

Shattered Dreams a UFUN Folly!
When your hope has changed by others actions!

When your hope has changed by others actions!

In the past few months our hopes have been up and down in every sense of the word. UFUN has abandoned us members in Thailand and left us with shattered dreams or is all of this just folly?

Some months ago, we joined a company call UFUN located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It was a company that was promoting a new digital currency called Utoken, something like Bitcoin but different!

The company  provided training to all members and prospective members on a daily, weekly basis throughout Thailand. We often had representatives from the home office to come and elaborate on the prosperity of UFUN. This also became evident as the numbers of members grew to 400,000+ world wide in 71 countries in just 18 months time. I also posted on my blog site (http://pv70pages.com),how successful UFUN had become. But, that was then and now is now!

UFUN promoted itself as an M2M (Member get Member) company with some products, bonus payments were made to those that were able to find new members and many members joined for this reason, they believed that they could make money and improve the lives of their families, also if you wanted to invest in Utokens, you could with a passive income investment mode meaning you did not need to recruit new members to make money, and this was all very good. Utokens were bought and sold on the Utokenkms.com platform, and the premise was that utoken never lost value and that was true. For months we made money in a passive investment as utokens continued to increase in value, this also applied to the members that made small investments. So, all active members prospered!

In all cases as the Utoken increased in value, our Utoken Reserve retained its intrinsic value, and our Utoken value was equated to our profits, and this differential created our Tradeable Utokens, which could be sold and the moneys withdrawn at 70% as 22% was used to buy additional Upoints or Utokens on the trading platform, and the remaining 5% was collected by UFUN the company.

UFUN was a money making company in the following ways; (1.) when you purchased one of their packages they always took a percentage of the investment and purchased Mineral Water which they claimed to donate to various charities, and this was very well publicized. (2.) When you bought or sold Utokens they would take 5% when they transferred the funds to you as mentioned above. To be noted they only allowed funds to be transferred 2 times in a month, always taking 21 days to reach your Bank (3.) There was also a charge when you wanted to transfer your Utokens, Investment points, or other points to another member (4.) lastly, we are not allowed to withdraw our total investment funds from UFUN or close out our accounts. 

In April of this year the Thailand Police raided UFUN Thailand, and many stories have evolved and this case is on-going, of which I will not elaborate!

Resulting from the above Thailand Police Investigation, all UFUN activities in Thailand have frozen, we have members that have spent months in jail, and our up-line members have vanished from the scene, leaving us members in an anxious state of mind, wondering what has happened to our investments. For those members that were  attempting to improve their financial worth, they were chastised by the police and accused of running a ponzi scheme, yet 99% of the members had no idea what a ponzi scheme is! And I suppose in Thailand where under the New Government which promotes “Thai Happiness” they do not realize that they shattered the dreams of over 100,000 Thai Members.

No matter what we do to contact the company, it is virtually impossible, we have even been told not to cause any waves due to the Police investigation, and what we are doing is bad for the members! What could be worse?

UFUN Company in Malaysia have now re-branded itself and now it is called UNASCOS, and once again they have started with a new platform, trading points, selling packages and promoting great profits for the new investors, yet, they provide us (existing members) with no updates of any value, especially concerning our UFUN Investments, and the investments I am talking about are in the Millions of USD$.

The CEO of UFUN/UNASCOS continues to promise all will be well, he promises that no member will loose any money, yet he does not allow for us to withdraw our investments, and this is the cause for grave concern! Further, the UNASCOS is telling us that the company is going into an investment IPO with a certain Nickle Mining operation in Indonesia and they are scheduled to be listed on the Australian Stock Exchange later this year! All of which sounds good, but not realistic! The Motto is “JUST WAIT, WE WILL ALL MAKE MONEY”

When I see this happening to us, and now it is starting again, where the new members in UNASCOS are making money and the original UFUN members are not included, yet they are holding our money, this leads me to believe that we have arrived at Shattered Dreams with UFUN!

 
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Posted by on 07/13/2015 in Crime Watch

 

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El Chapo Guzman’s prison escape update

A manhunt began immediately late Saturday for the head of the powerful Sinaloa Cartel, which has an international reach and is believed to control most of the major crossing points for drugs at the U.S. border with Mexico.

Associated Press journalists near the Altiplano said the roads were being heavily patrolled by Federal Police with numerous checkpoints and a Blackhawk helicopter flying overhead. Flights were also suspended at Toluca airport near the penitentiary in the state of Mexico, and civil aviation hangars were being searched.

Guzman was last seen about 9 p.m. Saturday in the shower area of his cell, according to a statement from the National Security Commission issued early Sunday. After a time, he was lost by the prison’s security camera surveillance network. Upon checking his cell, authorities found it empty and a 20-by-20-inch (50-by-50 centimeter) hole near the shower.

Guzman’s escape is a major embarrassment to the administration of President Enrique Pena Nieto, which had received plaudits for its aggressive approach to top drug lords. Since the government took office in late 2012, Mexican authorities have nabbed or killed six of them, including Guzman.

Guzman faces multiple federal drug trafficking indictments in the U.S. as well as Mexico, and was on the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s most-wanted list.

After Guzman was arrested on Feb. 22, 2014, the U.S. had said it would file an extradition request, though it’s not clear if that happened.

The Mexican government at the time vehemently denied the need to extradite Guzman, even as many expressed fears he would escape as he did in 2001 while serving a 20-year sentence in another maximum-security prison, Puente Grande, in the western state of Jalisco.

Former Mexican Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam told The AP earlier this year that the U.S. would get Guzman in “about 300 or 400 years” after he served time for all his crimes in Mexico. Murillo Karam said sending Guzman to the United States would save Mexico a lot of money, but keeping him was a question of national sovereignty.

He dismissed concerns that Guzman could escape a second time. That risk “does not exist,” Murillo Karam said.

It Trafficking drugs mapwas difficult to believe that such an elaborate structure could have been built without the detection of authorities. According to Rubido, the tunnel terminated in a house under construction in a neighborhood near the prison. Guzman dropped by ladder into a hole 10 meters (yards) deep that connected with a tunnel about 1.7 meters (yards) high that was fully ventilated.

Guzman is known for the elaborate tunnels his cartel has built underneath the Mexico-U.S. border to transport cocaine, methamphetamines and marijuana, with ventilation, lighting and even railcars to easily move products.

He was first caught by authorities in Guatemala in 1993, extradited and sentenced to 20 years in prison on drug-trafficking related charges. The lore says he escaped in a laundry cart, although there have been several versions of how he got away. What is clear is that he had help from prison guards, who were prosecuted and convicted.

Guzman was finally re-captured in February 2014 after eluding authorities for days across his home state of Sinaloa, for which the cartel is named. He was listed as 56 years old last year, though there are discrepancies in his birth date.

During his first stint as a fugitive, Guzman transformed himself from a middling Mexican capo into arguably the most powerful drug trafficker in the world. His fortune grew to be estimated at more than $1 billion, according to Forbes magazine, which listed him among the “World’s Most Powerful People” and ranked him above the presidents of France and Venezuela.

Guzman has long been known for his ability to pay off local residents and even authorities, who would tip him off to security operations launched for his capture. He finally was tracked down to a modest beachside high-rise in the Pacific Coast resort city of Mazatlan on Feb. 22, 2014, where he had been hiding with his wife and twin daughters. He was taken in the early morning without a shot fired.

But before they reached him, security forces went on a several-day chase through Culiacan, the capital of Sinaloa state. They found houses where Guzman supposedly had been staying with steel-enforced doors and the same kind of lighted, ventilated tunnels that allowed him to escape from a bathroom to an outside drainage ditch.

Even with his 2014 capture, Guzman’s continues to stretch throughout North America and reaches as far away as Europe and Australia. The cartel has been heavily involved in the bloody drug war that has torn through parts of Mexico for the last decade, taking at least an estimated 100,000 lives.

Altiplano, which is considered the main and most secure of Mexico’s federal prisons, also houses Zetas drug cartel leader Miguel Angel Trevino, and Edgar Valdes Villarreal, known as “La Barbie,” of the Beltran Leyva cartel.

 
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Posted by on 07/12/2015 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

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Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman has escaped

Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman has escaped after being imprisoned on February 22, 2014. I guess he just got tired of the same daily routine, and made a change!

Joaquin

Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman

MEXICO CITY – Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman has escaped from a maximum-security prison outside Mexico City, the government said Sunday, his second jail break in 14 years.

Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, pictured after his original recapture on February 22, 2014, has escaped from a maximum-security prison outside Mexico City, his second jail break in 14 years

The kingpin was last spotted by security cameras in the shower area of the Altiplano prison, 90 kilometers (55 miles) west of the capital, on Saturday night before disappearing, the National Security Commission said.

An alarm was issued after “he was not visible” for a while and “the escape of Guzman was confirmed,” the commission said in a statement.

“An operation to locate him was deployed in the area and on roads of neighboring states,” it said, adding that flights were suspended at the nearby Toluca airport.

His first escape from prison was in 2001, when he slipped past authorities by hiding in a laundry cart.

Marines finally recaptured Guzman in February 2014 in a pre-dawn raid in a condo in Mazatlan, a Pacific resort in Sinaloa state.

Guzman was considered the world’s most wanted drug lord, whose Sinaloa cartel shipped narcotics across the globe.

 
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Posted by on 07/12/2015 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

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New U.S. Immigration laws make Kidnapping More Profitable!

New U.S. Immigration laws make Kidnapping More Profitable!

Repost: Criminal groups in Mexico have kidnapped and extorted migrants for years, but their ability to prey upon people embarking on the perilous journey to the United States may well be inadvertently facilitated by the very policies intended to keep migrants out: border security.

A recent feature story in the New Yorker magazine details how heavy policing of traditional border crossing routes has pushed migrants to use more dangerous pathways through the Arizona and Texas deserts.

Not only has this US strategy of “deterrence through prevention” increased the risks that migrants face, but so has the evolution of the human smuggling trade at the border. While smugglers, or “coyotes,” used to work alone or in small, family-run networks, as the price of crossing the border has gone up — from $6,000 to over $8,000, according to the Dallas Morning News — transnational criminal groups have moved in. These groups are increasingly kidnapping migrants and holding them for ransom, until family members in the United States or Central America cough up thousands for their freedom.

The New Yorker also found that migrant kidnappings happen on the US side of the border as well, not just in Mexico. In both countries, migrants are reluctant to report kidnappings and extortion for fear of being deported, although the United States has laws that protect witnesses in criminal cases from deportation.

As one aid worker told the New Yorker, “When organized crime kidnaps somebody rich, the media and police mobilize. Then the criminals feel the heat. So they realized that, rather than doing one big, flashy kidnapping of someone rich and powerful, it would be better to do a hundred small kidnappings of migrants whom nobody pays attention to.”

As the New Yorker details, there are two primary reasons why migrants crossing into the US are increasingly at risk. The first is that border security apparatus in the United States has made illegally crossing more dangerous and more expensive. Secondly, the fragmentation of Mexico‘s traditional criminal groups means that migrants are now seen as another revenue source.

A 2013 report from the Washington Office on Latin America found that the Sinaloa Cartel and the Zetas orchestrated a full takeover of the “mom and pop” coyote businesses along US-Mexico border. While the Sinaloa Cartel tends to be less violent, the Zetas are especially renowened for extorting and kidnapping migrants, and killing those who do not pay up.

According to Mexico‘s statistics agency, there were 682 reported migrant kidnappings in 2014, a 1000 percent increase from the year before. While the rise could be due to better compilation of data, another potential explanation is that some Mexican border states, like Tamaulipas, are Zeta strongholds and remain racked by insecurity.

 
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Posted by on 05/02/2015 in Crime Watch, Crime!

 

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the capture of Sinaloa cartel boss Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman

the capture of Sinaloa cartel boss Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman

US authorities announced plans to seek the extradition of Mexico’s most powerful drug lord after his capture in a US-backed operation that included a drone, cellphone intercepts and elite Mexican marines.

As prosecutors in New York prepared their request, new details emerged Sunday from the manhunt that led to the capture of Sinaloa cartel boss Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, whose empire has smuggled drugs to the United States, Europe and Asia.

The US surveillance drone was used for two weeks between mid-January and mid-February to back up a massive operation in the northwestern city of Culiacan, a US government official told AFP on condition of anonymity.

Guzman eventually slipped out of Culiacan, the capital of Sinaloa state, after escaping through tunnels under one of his safe houses as the marines closed in on him, Mexican and US officials said.

Under pressure, the 56-year-old drug capo, who had been on the run since escaping from prison 13 years ago, fled further south to the beach resort city of Mazatlan.

It was there that the elite marine unit captured him on Saturday, in the fourth floor of a condominium, with a surprisingly small entourage that included one lookout, one bodyguard and a woman believed to be his beauty-queen wife, the US official said.

Guzman went down without a single shot.

“Cellular telephone intercepts were involved in the arrest,” the official said.

The US Drug Enforcement Administration had provided intelligence information to the marines.

The US official said the remote-controlled aircraft was not used in Mazatlan, but it had been deployed in Culiacan to corroborate other intelligence and that Mexico’s military had authorized its use.

One of the world’s most wanted man, Guzman had been spending most of his time in the bustling city of Culiacan, living in houses with escape tunnels, extra thick walls and steel-reinforced doors, officials said.

“It’s a big city where he has his contacts, his women, his houses,” the US official said.

Officials had hoped that Guzman would flee to a rural, more open space to capture him, and his decision to run to Mazatlan around three days before his arrest was a surprise, the official said.

His arrest capped a months-long operation that resulted in the arrests of a dozen Sinaloa cartel operatives, including alleged bodyguards of Guzman’s top associate, Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada.

Several cellphones were seized from the detainees and later used to establish wiretaps as part of the operation against the Sinaloa cartel, said an official from the Mexican attorney general’s office.

The official said authorities are still searching for Zambada, who is considered Guzman’s natural successor.

– US seeks extradition –

Nabbing Guzman, who is considered the world’s biggest drug trafficker, was a major victory in President Enrique Pena Nieto’s push to rein in drug violence in his country.

The Sinaloa cartel’s turf wars with rival gangs contributed to a wave of drug violence that left more than 77,000 people dead in the past seven years.

The United States had offered a $5 million reward for information leading to his capture, with several indictments in cities from New York to San Diego.

Robert Nardoza, a spokesman for the US Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York, said prosecutors there “plan to seek his extradition.”

A senior Republican lawmaker called for Guzman’s extradition, warning that “the biggest fish ever” may try to flee again in a repeat of his legendary 2001 escape from prison in a laundry cart.

“I think that would be the best course for not only Mexico, but also the United States, in ensuring that what happened in 2001 does not happen again,” Michael McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, told ABC television.

A Mexican foreign ministry spokesman declined to comment on the planned extradition request.

An official in the Mexican attorney general’s office said Guzman has to finish the 20-year sentence he avoided by fleeing eight years into his prison term.

But he is also facing new charges of drug trafficking, using illegal funds, organized crime and possession of weapons reserved for the military, the official said.

The captured kingpin is not facing murder charges

 
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Posted by on 02/24/2014 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

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Honduras and the Narco Islands!

English: West End of Roatán, Bay Islands, Honduras

English: West End of Roatán, Bay Islands, Honduras (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Islands off the coasts of Honduras and Belize, two of the poorest Central American nations, offer drug traffickers respite and a ready-made labour force to move their product.

The 31 bales were hidden among a stack of rickety wood. For three days, they had been harassed by the Honduran navy in La Mosquitia, in the Caribbean, which was looking for the 775 kilos of cocaine that had arrived in Caratasca. The clues pointed to the brothers Kork Anderson and Antonio Oscarealis Wrist Lucas, who come from Roatan, the main enclave of the Bay Islands.

They had hidden the 25-foot boat, which had two 200-horsepower motors, in Cayos Vivorillo, a naval zone with many small islands that drug traffickers use. They were carrying eight barrels of fuel; they also left their ID’s at home.

“It was an intense operation with good results,” Minister of Defense Marlon Pascua announced after the seizure.

Pascua added that the drugs were on their way from the Bay Islands to the north of Honduras and then, most likely, to the United States. But Pascua knew the brothers would likely be freed and not face charges.

“Normally these people are released because of bad [police] procedures,” he admitted.

Honduras: The Sieve

As in Panama, the Honduras’ islands of Cayos Vivorillo, with little police or military oversight, are a regular Caribbean drug transit point. The area has more than ten little islands and sandbanks, which form part of the province Gracias a Dios on the border with Nicaragua.

According to the United States government, up to 80 per cent of the cocaine that transits Mexico goes through Honduras first. Over the last few months, drug traffickers have changed their routes in order to bring drugs into Honduras and then to the United States. This is part of what the United States labels the drug triangle: from Colombia to Honduras to Mexico.

The coastal route has scattered maritime access, and within Honduras authorities do not rule out the existence of mini-cartels on Roatan (the biggest island), Utila and Guanaja, in the Caribbean Sea; and in the south bordering Nicaragua. Honduras has gone from being a narco-bridge to a drug reservoir.

Under the pretext of promoting tourism, the Bay Islands have been left without a gatekeeper. The police are mostly absent, and much of the drugs trafficked by sea flows to the islands without the type of government vigilance as you see in other areas.

According to local officials, 90 per cent of the Honduran fishing fleet is concentrated in these three islands. But the fishermen have learned to swap shellfish and lobster for the drugs that come from Colombia, particularly San Andres, and the Colombian islands off the coast of Nicaragua.

The fishermen return to the Bay Islands without the fish, but with a lot of drugs. These drugs are also used to pay for the services of the local traffickers, producing small but important flows of micro trafficking in the country, and fomenting tourist and local consumption.

The problem repeats itself throughout the region: a neglected area, a forgotten and poverty stricken population, and a tourist market combine to create a drug haven. According to CEINCO – the Honduran Armed Forces Information Centre — there are sectors in La Mosquitia that participate in and cover up this activity. But the authorities cannot criminalize poverty.

All around them there are signs of the narco-influx. Suspected drug traffickers are buying properties in the provinces of Gracias a Dios, Colon and all along the Honduran Atlantic coast. Few seem to check the provenance of the cash used to buy these properties, which are often promoted by US real estate agencies.

Belize: The Hinge

Belize is the hinge. With islands located between the borders of Mexico and Guatemala, it has become a nest for drugs and weapons shipments that cross part of the Rio Hondo. This river traverses numerous islands and cays in the southeast where Mexican groups such as the Beltran Leyva Organization (BLO) operates. The BLO seems to thrive in places like this: they also operate in Acapulco and Cancun in Mexico.

Drug operations are focused on the jungles of Peten and Los Cayos — a chain of 450 small coral islands — where criminal groups traffic narcotics, people, weapons, wood and exotic animals.

The tourist island of Cozumel, considered to be one of the 18 connecting points for the movement of drugs to other parts of the country, is a clear example. The network of Joaquin Guzman Loera, alias “El Chapo,” is allegedly in charge of this stretch.

Belize seems to have been swallowed by its neighbours’ problems. In 2012, there were 146 murders in a country that only has a population of 321,115 people — a murder rate of 44 per 100,000 people, double that of Mexico.

Written by:  Lourdes Ramirez

 
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Posted by on 10/06/2013 in Crime!

 

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Peru has become the world’s largest COCA producer

As reported

Peru has overtaken Colombia as the world’s largest coca crop cultivator, reinforcing its position as the world’s primary cocaine producer and highlighting the growing demand for the drug in Europe and regional markets.

According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) annual report “Peru: Cocaine Cultivation Monitoring 2012,” more than 60,000 hectares of coca crops were cultivated in Peru in 2012, compared to 48,000 hectares in neighbouring Colombia. Although coca cultivation decreased in both countries when compared to the previous year, in Peru it only dropped by 3.4 per-cent, while Colombian cultivation fell by 25 per-cent.

As in neighbouring Bolivia, Peru has a sizeable domestic demand for unprocessed coca leaves. However, according to the report, that demand could be met with less than 7,000 hectares of coca crop, suggesting that the vast majority of coca produced is destined for drug processing.

 PeruCoca9912

The Analysis

Peru’s newfound position as the number one cultivator of coca reinforces its status as the world’s primary producer of cocaine, a position it previously attained through growers’ use of coca strains that produce a higher cocaine yield. Even without these advantages, Peru would likely remain the world’s biggest cocaine supplier as interdiction rates are a fraction of those seen in Colombia.

The emergence of Peru as the world’s main supplier has been boosted by changing consumption patterns. Most Peruvian cocaine is destined for consumption in Brazil and Argentina or export to Europe — all markets that have grown substantially in recent years. In contrast, the US market has declined, but remains predominantly the domain of Colombian cocaine, which accounts for 95 per-cent of all imported product, according to US government estimates.

While cocaine production has been booming, prices have fallen to levels much lower than those seen in Peru’s rivals, to the extent that much of the cocaine that arrives in Argentina and Brazil from Bolivia now originates in Peru.

The thriving cocaine sector has inevitably attracted the interests of international organized crime groups, research in the country revealed the presence of Colombians, Mexicans and Russians. However, this has not yet led to growing violence, and Peru has yet to see the sort of criminal conflicts that still plague Colombia.

The Peruvian government has pledged to fight trafficking, announcing a hard-line anti-drug strategy in 2011. However, their efforts have yielded questionable results. Though authorities eradicated 12,000 hectares in the first half of 2013, it is unclear whether such efforts actually decrease the total cultivation area or if growers simply move elsewhere.

 
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Posted by on 09/28/2013 in Crime Watch, Crime!

 

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