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El Chapo (Shorty) Guzman on the Lam

El Chapo (Shorty) Guzman on the Lam

Although Mexico’s attorney general has called for a “full investigation” into Guzmán’s escape, we may never know exactly what happened. But if there is a level of complicity by the state, or state agencies, this would not be illogical. Friendly relations between the state and Guzmán would have a rational motive. Not for nothing did the Sinaloa cartel, until recently, have its own hangar at Mexico City airport, not far from the President’s.

In matters mafia, one of the dilemmas is whether it is harder for a state to live with an organised, patriarchal pyramid of power, like Guzmán’s, or the myriad mini-cartels, street-gang micro-cartels, so-called combos and super-combos, that arise if the pyramid is smashed. Which is worse: a formidable power with which some kind of accommodation is possible, or a narco-nuclear-fission reactor of electrons and protons charging into one another?

Colombia had to opt for smashing the pyramid, in the form of Pablo Escobar’s Medellin cartel, because it was becoming a a state within a state that threatened to take over. In the improving situation for Colombians, the problem is now the miasma of uncontrollable combos.

But the Mexican experience is different. The worst violence has ravaged the country since December 1996, when President Felipe Calderón sent the army into Tamaulipas and Michoacan to deal with insurgencies in those states by the Zetas and a cartel called La Familia, which were breaking up the prevailing order of things. Once the hornet’s nest was kicked, the killing accelerated as Guzmán laid claim to the whole frontier (previously allocated by his predecessor Gallardo) and the army and police established mafia systems of their own, often in league with one cartel or another.

In this war, Guzmán and the state have a common cause against the insurgents and new-wave cartels, and it is no secret that Mexico’s best bet in bringing down the violence is to back the strongest and biggest against its rivals, or at least to act in tandem. An official of the ruling PRI party, when it was fighting the last election, talked to me about the need for “adjustments” with the most powerful cartel.

The figures speak for themselves. For a while, in 2008, Tijuana was the most violent city in Mexico, as Guzmán assailed the local Arellano Felix cartel. Soon afterwards, Ciudad Juárez became the most dangerous city in the world, as Guzmán, the local Juárez cartel, army and police factions fought over local drug markets and smuggling routes to the US.

The military went into both places, followed by the Federal police, with Guzmán’s cartel gunmen on the slipstream of both, recruiting local gangs. Now, both cities are relatively quiet; no one knows quite why, but the most common (and terrifying) explanation is that Guzmán now runs the drug business – domestic and export – in both cities, with official or semi-official blessing.

The tunnel began with a 50-by-50-centimeter (20-by-20-inch) opening inside the shower of Guzman’s cell, Rubido said. The tunnel stretched for about a mile and ended inside a half-built house

To pull off the escape, it’s likely the Sinaloa cartel had spent years infiltrating the country’s prison system, a Mexican official said on Monday. Whoever helped in the plot likely had the architectural plans for the prison that pointed them toward the shower area, the official said.

Official: 'El Chapo' escape tunnel had motorcycle track

 As authorities detailed the evidence they’d found pointing to Guzman’s escape through the underground passageway, one drug war expert questioned Monday whether the notorious kingpin even used the tunnel at all.

“If he went out that tunnel, it was with an armed escort, most likely a mix of prison guards and his own people, if the past is prologue,” said Don Winslow, who’s tracked Guzman’s career for 15 years and wrote about a fictional version of the famed kingpin’s 2001 escape in his recent novel “The Cartel.”

“My bet is that he went out the front gate, and the tunnel was a tissue-thin face-saving device for Mexican officials, the motorcycle a dramatic improvement over the laundry cart.”

How did Guzman slip by the prison’s extensive network of security systems?

It’s likely prison workers played a role, Mexican Interior Minister Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong said Monday as he announced that he’d fired the prison’s director and other prison officials as authorities continue their investigation.

Guzman, he said, was inside a cell with 24-hour hour closed circuit video surveillance and a bracelet that monitored his every move. The video system, he said, had two blind spots that Guzman exploited. And he left the bracelet behind before he crawled into the tunnel and made his getaway.

Mexico’s attorney general said Monday that 34 people had been questioned in connection with the escape. And the country’s interior minister asked for help from the public in tracking Guzman down.

Where could he be?

It’s possible Guzman is hiding out in the sprawling metropolis of Mexico City while the search is hot, accordintg to a Mexican official.

But in the end, the official said it’s likely Guzman will head back to his home turf in the Sinaloa region on the Pacific Coast, where there’s a vast network of local residents who will help him stay out of harm’s way. Guzman is believed to have found refuge at times during his past stints on the lam in rugged mountain areas of Mexico.

No matter where he’s hiding, time is of the essence, according to Mike Braun, a former chief of operations for the Drug Enforcement Administration who spent years tracking and gathering evidence on Guzman.

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Posted by on 07/14/2015 in Crime Watch, Crime!

 

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Rafael Caro Quintero, responsible for killing of DEA agent in 1985 Released

A Mexican court’s releasing of a drug lord who killed a Drug Enforcement Administration agent in the 1980s is sparking outrage this weekend among U.S. law enforcement officials. Rafael Caro Quintero, who was sentenced to 40 years in prison for ordering the 1985 killing of DEA agent Enrique Camarena, was released earlier this week by a Mexican court that overturned the conviction, saying he had been improperly tried in a federal court for state crimes.

The Justice Department said it found the court’s decision “deeply troubling.” “The Department of Justice, and especially the Drug Enforcement Administration, is extremely disappointed with this result,” the agency said in a statement. The Justice Department also said it “has continued to make clear to Mexican authorities the continued interest of the United States in securing Caro Quintero’s extradition so that he might face justice in the United States.”

The DEA said separately it “will vigorously continue its efforts to ensure Caro Quintero faces charges in the United States for the crimes he committed.” Caro Quintero still faces charges in the United States. Meanwhile, the Mexican government said Friday it was reviewing what legal moves it might take in the case, according to The Wall Street Journal. The country’s attorney general’s office said in a statement it disagrees with the immediate liberation and the court should have handed over the case to the proper court for review. The office also said Caro Quintero’s charges were too serious to free him without exhausting all legal channels. In recent years, Mexico has stepped up extraditions of alleged drug kingpins to the U.S., usually after they have served some prison time in Mexico, according to The Journal.

The whereabouts of the 61-year-old Quintero is unclear, after serving 20 years and walking out of prison. The Association of Former Federal Narcotics Agents in the United States said it was “outraged” by Caro Quintero’s early release and blamed corruption within Mexico’s justice system. “The release of this violent butcher is but another example of how good faith efforts by the U.S. to work with the Mexican government can be frustrated by those powerful dark forces that work in the shadows of the Mexican ‘justice’ system,” the organization said in a statement.

Mexican authorities did not release the full decision explaining the reasoning of the three-judge panel, in the western state of Jalisco, in setting free Caro Quintero. But some experts said the ruling may have been part of a broader push to rebalance the Mexican legal system in favor of defendants’ rights, from both law-enforcement officials and the independent judicial system.

Mexico’s Supreme Court has issued several recent rulings overturning cases while saying due process wasn’t followed. However, Mexican and current and former U.S. officials alike expressed deep skepticism that correct procedures were followed in the decision to free Caro Quintero. Caro Quintero was a founding member of one of Mexico’s earliest and biggest drug cartels. He helped establish a powerful cartel based in the northwestern Mexican state of Sinaloa that later split into some of Mexico’s largest cartels, including the Sinaloa and Juarez cartels. But he wasn’t tried for drug trafficking, a federal crime in Mexico. Instead, Mexican federal prosecutors, under intense pressure from the United States, put together a case against him for Camarena’s kidnapping and killing, both state crimes. Mexican courts and prosecutors have long tolerated illicit evidence such as forced confessions and have frequently based cases on questionable testimony or hearsay.

Such practices have been banned by recent judicial reforms, but past cases, including those against high-level drug traffickers, are often rife with such legal violations. Mexico’s relations with Washington were badly damaged when Caro Quintero ordered Camarena kidnapped, tortured and killed, purportedly because he was angry about a raid on a 220-acre (89-hectare) marijuana plantation in central Mexico named “Rancho Bufalo” – Buffalo Ranch – that was seized by Mexican authorities at Camarena’s insistence.

Camarena was kidnapped in Guadalajara, a major drug trafficking center at the time. His body and that of his Mexican pilot, both showing signs of torture, were found a month later, buried in shallow graves. Caro Quintero was eventually hunted down in Costa Rica.

 
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Posted by on 08/11/2013 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

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Mexican Cartels sending trusted agents to work in USA!

Mexican drug cartels whose operatives once rarely ventured beyond the U.S. border are dispatching some of their most trusted agents to live and work deep inside the United States — an emboldened presence that experts believe is meant to tighten their grip on the world’s most lucrative narcotics market and maximize profits.

If left unchecked, authorities say, the cartels’ move into the American interior could render the syndicates harder than ever to dislodge and pave the way for them to expand into other criminal enterprises such as prostitution, kidnapping-and-extortion rackets and money laundering.

Cartel activity in the U.S. is certainly not new. Starting in the 1990s, the ruthless syndicates became the nation’s No. 1 supplier of illegal drugs, using unaffiliated middlemen to smuggle cocaine, marijuana and heroin beyond the border or even to grow pot here.

But a wide-ranging Associated Press review of federal court cases and government drug-enforcement data, plus interviews with many top law enforcement officials, indicate the groups have begun deploying agents from their inner circles to the U.S. Cartel operatives are suspected of running drug-distribution networks in at least nine non-border states, often in middle-class suburbs in the Midwest, South and Northeast.

“It’s probably the most serious threat the United States has faced from organized crime,” said Jack Riley, head of the Drug Enforcement Administration‘s Chicago office.

The cartel threat looms so large that one of Mexico’s most notorious drug kingpins — a man who has never set foot in Chicago — was recently named the city’s Public Enemy No. 1, the same notorious label once assigned to Al Capone.

The Chicago Crime Commission, a non-government agency that tracks crime trends in the region, said it considers Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman even more menacing than Capone because Guzman leads the deadly Sinaloa cartel, which supplies most of the narcotics sold in Chicago and in many cities across the U.S.

Years ago, Mexico faced the same problem — of then-nascent cartels expanding their power — “and didn’t nip the problem in the bud,” said Jack Killorin, head of an anti-trafficking program in Atlanta for the Office of National Drug Control Policy. “And see where they are now.”

Riley sounds a similar alarm: “People think, `The border’s 1,700 miles away. This isn’t our problem.’ Well, it is. These days, we operate as if Chicago is on the border.”

Border states from Texas to California have long grappled with a cartel presence. But cases involving cartel members have now emerged in the suburbs of Chicago and Atlanta, as well as Columbus, Ohio, Louisville, Ky., and rural North Carolina. Suspects have also surfaced in Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota and Pennsylvania.

Mexican drug cartels “are taking over our neighborhoods,” Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane warned a legislative committee in February. State Police Commissioner Frank Noonan disputed her claim, saying cartels are primarily drug suppliers, not the ones trafficking drugs on the ground.

For years, cartels were more inclined to make deals in Mexico with American traffickers, who would then handle transportation to and distribution within major cities, said Art Bilek, a former organized crime investigator who is now executive vice president of the crime commission.

As their organizations grew more sophisticated, the cartels began scheming to keep more profits for themselves. So leaders sought to cut out middlemen and assume more direct control, pushing aside American traffickers, he said.

Beginning two or three years ago, authorities noticed that cartels were putting “deputies on the ground here,” Bilek said. “Chicago became such a massive market … it was critical that they had firm control.”

To help fight the syndicates, Chicago recently opened a first-of-its-kind facility at a secret location where 70 federal agents work side-by-side with police and prosecutors. Their primary focus is the point of contact between suburban-based cartel operatives and city street gangs who act as retail salesmen. That is when both sides are most vulnerable to detection, when they are most likely to meet in the open or use cellphones that can be wiretapped.

Others are skeptical about claims cartels are expanding their presence, saying law-enforcement agencies are prone to exaggerating threats to justify bigger budgets.

David Shirk, of the University of San Diego’s Trans-Border Institute, said there is a dearth of reliable intelligence that cartels are dispatching operatives from Mexico on a large scale.

“We know astonishingly little about the structure and dynamics of cartels north of the border,” Shirk said. “We need to be very cautious about the assumptions we make.”

Statistics from the DEA suggest a heightened cartel presence in more U.S. cities. In 2008, around 230 American communities reported some level of cartel presence. That number climbed to more than 1,200 in 2011, the most recent year for which information is available, though the increase is partly due to better reporting.

Dozens of federal agents and local police interviewed by the AP said they have identified cartel members or operatives using wiretapped conversations, informants or confessions. Hundreds of court documents reviewed by the AP appear to support those statements.

“This is the first time we’ve been seeing it — cartels who have their operatives actually sent here,” said Richard Pearson, a lieutenant with the Louisville Metropolitan Police Department, which arrested four alleged operatives of the Zetas cartel in November in the suburb of Okolona.

People who live on the tree-lined street where authorities seized more than 2,400 pounds of marijuana and more than $1 million in cash were shocked to learn their low-key neighbors were accused of working for one of Mexico’s most violent drug syndicates, Pearson said.

One of the best documented cases is Jose Gonzalez-Zavala, who was dispatched to the U.S. by the La Familia cartel, according to court filings.

In 2008, the former taxi driver and father of five moved into a spacious home at 1416 Brookfield Drive in a middle-class neighborhood of Joliet, southwest of Chicago. From there, court papers indicate, he oversaw wholesale shipments of cocaine in Illinois, Wisconsin and Indiana.

Wiretap transcripts reveal he called an unidentified cartel boss in Mexico almost every day, displaying the deference any midlevel executive might show to someone higher up the corporate ladder. Once he stammered as he explained that one customer would not pay a debt until after a trip.

“No,” snaps the boss. “What we need is for him to pay.”

The same cartel assigned Jorge Guadalupe Ayala-German to guard a Chicago-area stash house for $300 a week, plus a promised $35,000 lump-sum payment once he returned to Mexico after a year or two, according to court documents.

Ayala-German brought his wife and child to help give the house the appearance of an ordinary family residence. But he was arrested before he could return home and pleaded guilty to multiple trafficking charges. He will be sentenced later this year.

Socorro Hernandez-Rodriguez was convicted in 2011 of heading a massive drug operation in suburban Atlanta’s Gwinnett County. The chief prosecutor said he and his associates were high-ranking figures in the La Familia cartel — an allegation defense lawyers denied.

And at the end of February outside Columbus, Ohio, authorities arrested 34-year-old Isaac Eli Perez Neri, who allegedly told investigators he was a debt collector for the Sinaloa cartel.

An Atlanta attorney who has represented reputed cartel members says authorities sometimes overstate the threat such men pose.

“Often, you have a kid whose first time leaving Mexico is sleeping on a mattress at a stash house playing Game Boy, eating Burger King, just checking drugs or money in and out,” said Bruce Harvey. “Then he’s arrested and gets a gargantuan sentence. It’s sad.”

Because cartels accumulate houses full of cash, they run the constant risk associates will skim off the top. That points to the main reason cartels prefer their own people: Trust is hard to come by in their cutthroat world. There’s also a fear factor. Cartels can exert more control on their operatives than on middlemen, often by threatening to torture or kill loved ones back home.

Danny Porter, chief prosecutor in Gwinnett County, Ga., said he has tried to entice dozens of suspected cartel members to cooperate with American authorities. Nearly all declined. Some laughed in his face.

“They say, `We are more scared of them (the cartels) than we are of you. We talk and they’ll boil our family in acid,”‘ Porter said. “Their families are essentially hostages.”

Citing the safety of his own family, Gonzalez-Zavala declined to cooperate with authorities in exchange for years being shaved off his 40-year sentence.

In other cases, cartel brass send their own family members to the U.S.

“They’re sometimes married or related to people in the cartels,” Porter said. “They don’t hire casual labor.” So meticulous have cartels become that some even have operatives fill out job applications before being dispatched to the U.S., Riley added.

In Mexico, the cartels are known for a staggering number of killings — more than 50,000, according to one tally. Beheadings are sometimes a signature.

So far, cartels don’t appear to be directly responsible for large numbers of slayings in the United States, though the Texas Department of Public Safety reported 22 killings and five kidnappings in Texas at the hands of Mexican cartels from 2010 through mid- 2011.

Still, police worry that increased cartel activity could fuel heightened violence.

In Chicago, the police commander who oversees narcotics investigations, James O’Grady, said street-gang disputes over turf account for most of the city’s uptick in murders last year, when slayings topped 500 for the first time since 2008. Although the cartels aren’t dictating the territorial wars, they are the source of drugs.

Riley’s assessment is stark: He argues that the cartels should be seen as an underlying cause of Chicago’s disturbingly high murder rate.

“They are the puppeteers,” he said. “Maybe the shooter didn’t know and maybe the victim didn’t know that. But if you follow it down the line, the cartels are ultimately responsible.”

 
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Posted by on 04/02/2013 in Crime!, Drugs, Mexican Drug Cartels, Money Laundering

 

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Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman Loera “Public Enemy Number One”

Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman Loera “Public Enemy Number One”
Al Capone. Mugshot information from Science an...

Al Capone. Mugshot information from Science and Society Picture Gallery: Al Capone (1899-1947), American gangster, 17 June 1931. ‘Al Capone sent to prison. This picture shows the Bertillon photographs of Capone made by the US Dept of Justice. His rogue’s gallery number is C 28169’. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

CHICAGO, Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman Loera, leader of the Sinaloa cartel, was billed as the new “public enemy number one” in Chicago, heading the Crime Commission that city created to refer to mobster Al Capone in the decade of the 30s. “Guzman is for narcotics was what Al Capone for beer and whiskey,” he said at a press conference the commission’s vice president, Al Bilek, adding that “compared with ‘El Chapo’, Al Capone look like a fan.” Bilek, with the director in Chicago the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA, in English), Jack Riley Davis, said the announcement as an “extraordinary event” not recorded since 1930. The nongovernmental organization keeps track of crime trends in the city and has already qualified to others as public enemies, but Capone was the only one who had been declared the number one until now.

Davis said Guzman Loera is the main supplier of drugs sold in Chicago or distributed from this city to the rest of America. “his agents work in the Chicago area, the third most populous city in the U.S. , importing vast quantities of marijuana, cocaine and methamphetamine to sell from here across the region, in-turn collecting tens of millions of dollars being smuggled into Mexico.

Meanwhile, Riley, noted that Chicago has been identified as the drug distribution center of the Sinaloa cartel, which has 100,000 members among gang members believed to exist in the city and suburbs. “Although Chicago is two thousand 400 kilometers from Mexico, the cartel is so embedded in the city that police authorities and local and federal agencies are required to act as if they were on the border.

According to the director of the DEA in Chicago, the police of this city have faced organized crime groups since early 1930, and the most notorious was the Italian Mafia. “But they were more ruthless Capone and the Mafia, Mexican traffickers as the Sinaloa cartel are unparalleled … today if we faced traditional organized crime in Chicago against Guzman and his cartel would not be a fight.

In my opinion, “El Chapo” is the new Al Capone in Chicago. ” According to Riley, Guzman Loera’s ability to “corrupt and punish” their opponents, makes him “more powerful than Italian Mafia organized crime ” . He added that if “El Chapo” was arrested in Mexico he could be extradited to Chicago and processed by a federal judge along with other members of the drug gang.

One is Vicente Zambada Niebla, the son of “El Mayo” Zambada, who is awaiting trial since his extradition in March 2010 for allegedly working as a logistics coordinator for the cartel’s operations in Chicago.

With information from EFE / NTX PROFILE “Face cut ” although Alphonse Gabriel Capone was born in Brookyln, New York on January 17, 1899, his parents are natives of Italy. Capone began his criminal career from youth, belonging to the most dangerous gangs of the era, such as “Five Points Gang.”

In the late ’20s and Al Capone topped the list of the FBI’s most wanted because of their “business” of selling alcohol, illegal gambling and prostitution. was known as “Scarface” by an incident at the nightclub Yale’s, where he became drunk and insulted one of the employees, the brother of the girl came to his defense and pulled a knife, cutting his face three times.

Capone led the Mafia in Chicago from 1925 after eliminating all rivals. The most famous crime attributed to him is the “Valentine’s Massacre” occurred on February 14, 1929, when the band ended with Morgan Bug gangster. Capone was arrested in 1931 and sentenced to 11 years in prison in October. He was released in 1939, and died of pneumonia on January 21, 1947.

 
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Posted by on 02/18/2013 in Crime!

 

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Los Zetas and hezbollah share money laundering ops

Specialists and U.S. authorities confirm the link with terrorist Ayman Joumaa Zetas

laundering and weapons training are the main points in the relationship between Mexican drug cartels and alleged international terrorist groups operating in the country as Hezbollah.

los zetas and hezbollah shre money laundering links

los zetas and hezbollah share money laundering links

Although not confirmed links between drug trafficking and terrorist groups by Mexican authorities, according to experts and a review by the Strategic Studies Institute United States Army War College was raised otherwise.

The presence in our country last year, a member of Hezbollah and two suspected members of the terrorist group also put on alert Mexican authorities and the United States.

According to a study by the international analyst Douglas Farah, in recent years there has been a relationship that involves just business and money laundering between the cartel Los Zetas and the terrorist organization Hezbollah.

The report, which cites U.S. authorities, notes that Los Zetas have the same money launderer Hizbollah: it is a Lebanese criminal named Ayman Joumaa, 48, who is known to have coordinated in collaboration with the Mexican cartel , smuggling of cocaine from Colombia through Central America and Mexico.

In December 2011 the U.S. Attorney in the Eastern District of Virginia said Joumaa is the axis that does business between Los Zetas and Hezbollah without any ideological relationship between the two criminal organizations.

It was on December 12 of that year when, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA, for its acronym in English), the U.S. government filed charges against Ayman Joumaa, on charges of drug trafficking and money laundering.

The indictment alleges that he and his accomplices introduced drugs from Colombia to Mexico to Los Zetas and the proceeds would be sent and laundered worldwide to finally be placed on business or accounts belonging to Hezbollah.

Facilitator

According to DEA sources quoted at the time, the criminal activities of Joumaa, who is linked to Hezbollah, facilitated the work of “numerous global drug trafficking organizations, including the criminal activities of the cartel Los Zetas . “

The latest reports from the DEA said the Lebanese citizen in Colombia, currently washing over 200 million dollars a month to support the financing of Hezbollah.

During a hearing before the Armed Services Committee of the U.S. Senate in March 2012, General Douglas Fraser, head of U.S. Southern Command, noted that the Treasury Department had found connections between two criminal groups.

According to the statements, Ayman Joumaa washed about 850 million to Los Zetas through a Canadian bank, and was also accused of smuggling tons of cocaine.

“Although we have not yet seen any international terrorist groups attempt to capitalize on these routes of transfer, we vigilant of the potential threat that transnational criminal organizations collaborate to introduce terrorists,” said Fraser.

For Senator Arturo Zamora Jimenez, who in 2011 denounced Hezbollah’s presence in our country, based on information from the U.S. House of Representatives, it is certain that there are terrorist groups that movement that are conducting training processes criminal groups.

Hezbollah is a political and military power of the Islamic Shia of Lebanon.

It was designated as a foreign terrorist organization in October 1997 and as a threat to the peace process in the Middle East in January 1995.

 
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Posted by on 01/14/2013 in Crime!, Money Laundering

 

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The Tacks, leader of the Arellano Felix in Tijuana Arrested

Alfredo César García Meza was turned over to federal authorities for his extradition to the U.S.

 

The Tacks, leader of the Arellano Felix in Tijuana Arrested

TIJUANA, Elements of the State Preventive Police (PEP) Alfredo Meza apprehended César García, alias “El Tacks”, alleged leader of the Arellano Felix cartel in the border and who is wanted by U.S. authorities.

The director of the corporation owned by the Ministry of Public Security of the state, Marco Antonio Gómez Montoya said also stopped other alleged members of the criminal group, including a woman.

He explained that Garcia Meza was wanted by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) of the U.S., so this subject was made available to federal authorities for his extradition to the United States.

The official said that agents also arrested PEP Lagunas Adrian Vazquez, alias “El Macho Prieto” and other alleged members of that cartel, which disintegrated into a dangerous crime cell operating in this border.

The incident occurred on Boulevard Agua Caliente in this city, when Garcia Meza was recognized by police officers and confirmed his identity after it was discovered that he had a provisional warrant for extradition to the United States on charges of organized crime.

After which the police moved to the colony of Sepanal, where Joselyn and Leslie Marquez, 23, acted to commit an act of crime in a subdivision of Playas de Tijuana.

There also arrested Zazueta Luis Angel Cornejo, with one kilogram of cocaine, whose was paid $ 500.

In colonia Terrazas del Valle, agents intercepted a Ford Explorer 2002 and detained foreign plates Lagunas Vazquez and his companion Luis Gabriel Ramirez Duenas.

Both suspects were arrested and guns, drugs, a charger and plastic scrap for drug dosing was seized.

Later, in the Buena Vista neighborhood, she assured José Francisco Farias Prado, alias “Chucho”, who was driving a vehicle Geo Metro 1991, a wrapper with the drug known as “ice”.

The detainees were turned over to the appropriate authorities.

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on 09/28/2012 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

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(PGR) destroyed more than 588 tons and 531,000 liters of precursor chemicals

PGR destroyed more than 588 tons of precursor chemicals

Attorney General’s Office (PGR) in Querétaro destroyed more than 588 tons and 531,000 liters of precursor chemicals

The agency reported that among the substances are destroyed phenylacetamide, tartaric acid and phenylacetic.

The delegation of the Attorney General’s Office (PGR) in Querétaro destroyed more than 588 tons and 531,000 liters of precursor chemicals used to make synthetic drugs.

The dependence reported that among substances are destroyed phenylacetamide, tartaric acid, phenylacetic acid, sodium hydroxide, sodium phenylacetate and benzyl chloride.

He explained that the weighing and the destruction of the substances were given by the delegation of the PGR in Querétaro, and staff of the Internal Control and experts in the field of chemistry.

The PGR said that this destruction, and securing and dismantling of 712 laboratories, are part of its efforts to combat dependence on the production of synthetic or designer drugs.

He also recalled that recently signed with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA, for its acronym in English) the Memorandum of Cooperation in Relation to Law Enforcement against clandestine laboratories and synthetic drugs.

In a statement the agency explained that the purpose of this agreement is to strengthen cooperation and more effectively combat drug production in these laboratories.

 
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Posted by on 09/17/2012 in Crime!, Drugs

 

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