RSS

Tag Archives: Guzman

the capture of Sinaloa cartel boss Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman

the capture of Sinaloa cartel boss Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman

US authorities announced plans to seek the extradition of Mexico’s most powerful drug lord after his capture in a US-backed operation that included a drone, cellphone intercepts and elite Mexican marines.

As prosecutors in New York prepared their request, new details emerged Sunday from the manhunt that led to the capture of Sinaloa cartel boss Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, whose empire has smuggled drugs to the United States, Europe and Asia.

The US surveillance drone was used for two weeks between mid-January and mid-February to back up a massive operation in the northwestern city of Culiacan, a US government official told AFP on condition of anonymity.

Guzman eventually slipped out of Culiacan, the capital of Sinaloa state, after escaping through tunnels under one of his safe houses as the marines closed in on him, Mexican and US officials said.

Under pressure, the 56-year-old drug capo, who had been on the run since escaping from prison 13 years ago, fled further south to the beach resort city of Mazatlan.

It was there that the elite marine unit captured him on Saturday, in the fourth floor of a condominium, with a surprisingly small entourage that included one lookout, one bodyguard and a woman believed to be his beauty-queen wife, the US official said.

Guzman went down without a single shot.

“Cellular telephone intercepts were involved in the arrest,” the official said.

The US Drug Enforcement Administration had provided intelligence information to the marines.

The US official said the remote-controlled aircraft was not used in Mazatlan, but it had been deployed in Culiacan to corroborate other intelligence and that Mexico’s military had authorized its use.

One of the world’s most wanted man, Guzman had been spending most of his time in the bustling city of Culiacan, living in houses with escape tunnels, extra thick walls and steel-reinforced doors, officials said.

“It’s a big city where he has his contacts, his women, his houses,” the US official said.

Officials had hoped that Guzman would flee to a rural, more open space to capture him, and his decision to run to Mazatlan around three days before his arrest was a surprise, the official said.

His arrest capped a months-long operation that resulted in the arrests of a dozen Sinaloa cartel operatives, including alleged bodyguards of Guzman’s top associate, Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada.

Several cellphones were seized from the detainees and later used to establish wiretaps as part of the operation against the Sinaloa cartel, said an official from the Mexican attorney general’s office.

The official said authorities are still searching for Zambada, who is considered Guzman’s natural successor.

– US seeks extradition –

Nabbing Guzman, who is considered the world’s biggest drug trafficker, was a major victory in President Enrique Pena Nieto’s push to rein in drug violence in his country.

The Sinaloa cartel’s turf wars with rival gangs contributed to a wave of drug violence that left more than 77,000 people dead in the past seven years.

The United States had offered a $5 million reward for information leading to his capture, with several indictments in cities from New York to San Diego.

Robert Nardoza, a spokesman for the US Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York, said prosecutors there “plan to seek his extradition.”

A senior Republican lawmaker called for Guzman’s extradition, warning that “the biggest fish ever” may try to flee again in a repeat of his legendary 2001 escape from prison in a laundry cart.

“I think that would be the best course for not only Mexico, but also the United States, in ensuring that what happened in 2001 does not happen again,” Michael McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, told ABC television.

A Mexican foreign ministry spokesman declined to comment on the planned extradition request.

An official in the Mexican attorney general’s office said Guzman has to finish the 20-year sentence he avoided by fleeing eight years into his prison term.

But he is also facing new charges of drug trafficking, using illegal funds, organized crime and possession of weapons reserved for the military, the official said.

The captured kingpin is not facing murder charges

 
Comments Off on the capture of Sinaloa cartel boss Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman

Posted by on 02/24/2014 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Does Chapo Guzman care about being on Forbes list?

Does he look worried about not being on Forbes list of the richest men?

Does he look worried about not being on Forbes list of the richest men?

Consequently, Guzman’s inclusion in the Forbes list, which suggested a degree of influence over crime in Mexico that a careful analysis did not support, largely contradicted the prevailing trend inside the nation. This will likely be increasingly true going forward, as group’s like Guzman’s Sinaloa Cartel collectively continue to cede market share to a growing number of smaller regional gangs, like the Knights Templar (Caballeros Templarios) or the Independent Cartel of Acapulco.

Furthermore, the revenue structure for Mexican criminal groups have tilted away from the high-margin traffic of cocaine (the activity with the greatest potential to spawn a highly wealthy boss) to lower-margin, labor-intensive practices like kidnapping and extortion, theft and human smuggling.
While Guzman’s inclusion appeared to be aimed at publicity more than it was the result of methodological rigor, the impact of his being placed alongside names like Gates and Slim changed the perceptions of public security in Mexico. Guzman turned into the foremost emblem of Mexican crime, and his wealth and manifest impunity –Guzman escaped from prison in 2001 — was a sign for some that Mexico had little chance of defending itself against such a threat.
This was true despite the lack of evidence to support the estimate of Guzman’s fortune. His partner Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada called the calculation “nonsense” in 2010. More damningly, in 2009, Forbes editor Luisa Kroll offered only unconvincing ramblings as a justification: “There are people that make it their job to be tracking this money trail and we have a Spanish-speaking reporter who spent a lot of time in Mexico and has a lot of sources whether in the Drug Enforcement Agency and separate consultancies that helped him track and get a handle and find the right people to talk to, to track the drug money but because it is such a huge problem, there are definitely a lot of people that are tracking the money that’s flowing through the drugs.”

Nonetheless, for the US media, a billionaire capo became a conveniently sensationalist and simplistic symbol for a hugely complicated situation. The Washington Post, to take but one of many examples, casually referred to Guzman as a “billionaire cartel boss” in 2010.
By way of addressing the exclusion, Forbes explained that, “[Guzman] has to spend more of his money on security and bribes to protect his family, meaning his annual take of the world’s massive cocaine trade … is getting thinner and thinner.”

Such logic is, of course, every bit as unsupported and faulty as were the initial calculations of his worth. Forbes does not back up its assertion with any figure more concrete than an offhand references to “our numbers.” Moreover, even if his profit margins are getting thinner, unless Forbes is actually retracting its prior claims about his accumulated wealth, it should not matter: as long as the margins are positive, he’s still adding to that fortune that was previously calculated at an even $1 billion.
In short, the only logically coherent way for Forbes to pull Guzman from the list would be to explicitly renounce its prior methodology and issue a correction. Unfortunately, the magazine was unwilling to go that far. Nonetheless, insofar as it represents the opening of a more nuanced view of Mexico in general and organized crime in particular, this is a positive step.

 
Comments Off on Does Chapo Guzman care about being on Forbes list?

Posted by on 03/09/2013 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

alleged nephew of Sinaloa Cartel leader Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman in Colombia

The security agencies of the Government of Colombia are on alert after detecting the presence of several Mexican citizens, including an alleged nephew of Sinaloa Cartel leader Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.

Nephew of El Chapo located in Colombia
Nephew of El Chapo located in Colombia

According to information released by the electronic portal of the Colombian newspaper El Tiempo, Mexicans have been detected in areas of influence of local criminal groups known as Rastrojos and Urabeños, making the Colombian authorities suspect a potential alliance between that organization ‘El Chapo’ Guzman with South American drug traffickers for trafficking of synthetic drugs.

According to the memo, the alleged nephew of ‘El Chapo’, was not mentioned by name, but reportedly met at an apartment in northern Bogota to coordinate with heads of Rastrojos starting the business of the transfer of synthetic drugs.

In that place, it was noted, that a video was made, and is being reviewed by the authorities. In addition, several members of the band, including a guy nicknamed ‘Pinki’ were captured.

The intention of the Sinaloa Cartel is to have a presence in strategic areas of shipping and cargoes of cocaine output, according to information released at the time.

Colombian security agencies are to follow up on the evidence left by the Mexicans in areas such as Buenaventura, Cali, Urabá, Medellin and Bogota.

The Ombudsman has also received reports in which he speaks about the presence of Mexicans in Buenaventura, who would be checking out of cocaine.

“These people have no legal documents, therefore we believe that fly in and out by plane,” he told an investigator Weather case. Information held by security agencies Colombia, indicates that the meetings between the nephew of ‘Chapo’ Guzman and the heirs of the Rastrojos and Urabeños, dating back months.

For the Rastrojos, the contact would be a cousin of Diego Perez Henao, ‘Diego Stubble’. This family has already been identified, but has no warrants, and within the band is known as ‘Chicken Bobo’, says the note. “He is the person who assumed the military command and drug trafficking by members of the organization who were in the wing of Diego Stubble “refers the researcher.

Urabeños, is the link for Héctor Urdinola, ‘Chico’ or ‘Zarco’, who inherited the band Males and allied with the Urabeños to displace Rastrojos. That fight for routes and territory has generated hundreds of deaths, especially in the Valle del Cauca.

 
Comments Off on alleged nephew of Sinaloa Cartel leader Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman in Colombia

Posted by on 01/06/2013 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

El Chapo Guzman’s alleged daughter pleads not guilty in U.S

Gisselle Alejandrina Guzmán Salazar pleaded not guilty of illegally entering the country, to use foreign documents and lying to authorities

Gisselle Alejandrina Guzman Salazar alleged daughter of El Chapo Guzman

SAN DIEGO-Gisselle Alejandrina Guzmán Salazar, who has been identified by U.S. officials as an alleged daughter of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, Monday through her lawyers pled not guilty to dozen immigration charges

Guzmán Salazar, who appeared before Judge Jan Adler in a brief hearing wearing red prison uniform faded, pleaded not guilty of illegally entering the country, to use foreign documents and lying to authorities, orally and in writing.

The girl, who exposed her pregnancy, was due to appear in court on November 30.

According to the criminal complaint, Guzman Salazar was arrested this month on the border when he tried to enter the United States with foreign immigration documents.

Guzmán Salazar sought to enter U.S. territory to give birth, according to U.S. documents.

 
Comments Off on El Chapo Guzman’s alleged daughter pleads not guilty in U.S

Posted by on 10/26/2012 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Mexico to rescue its bloody war on drug cartels must catch El Chapo!

Eleven years later, President Felipe Calderon‘s government is furiously trying to flush out the man nicknamed El Chapo – “Shorty” – to rescue its bloody war on drug cartels. 

Joaquin Guzman, alias “El Chapo" No 1
Joaquin Guzman, alias “El Chapo” No 1

Guzman’s flight from a maximum security prison in a laundry cart on January 19, 2001, was a major embarrassment to Calderon’s predecessor Vicente Fox, who had just begun a new era as the first National Action Party (PAN) official to lead Mexico.

Now, Guzman is the greatest symbol of the cartels’ defiance of Calderon, whose war unleashed a wave of gang violence that is eroding support for the PAN ahead of presidential elections on July 1. Calderon is barred by law from seeking a second term.

In the last few months, authorities have arrested dozens of Guzman’s henchmen, seized tons of his contraband and razed the biggest single marijuana plantation ever found in Mexico, subsequently chalked up as another setback for El Chapo. 

Over Christmas, three senior Guzman associates fell into Mexico’s hands, including one named as his chief of operations in Durango, a state where he has been rumored to hide out. “He’s certainly aware people very close to him have been captured over the past two weeks, so he must be seriously concerned,” said Vanda Felbab-Brown, a Brookings Institution expert on the drug trade. “The noose seems to be tightening.” 

Since his nighttime escape, Guzman’s legend has grown daily, as the wily capo evaded capture, eliminated rivals and sold billions of dollars worth of drugs across the border. Meanwhile, the PAN, who won office under Fox pledging to restore law and order in a country tired of the corruption that marred the 71-year reign of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), has become more and more bogged down in the drug war. 

Calderon staked his reputation on rooting out the cartels, but the army-led struggle has cost over 46,000 lives in five years, spooking tourists and investors alike. As Calderon fought to contain the violence, he had to watch Guzman feted for success when the kingpin placed 41st in a Forbes list of the world’s most powerful people in 2009. Immortalized in song both in Spanish and English, Guzman seemed so untouchable that rumors began spreading the Mexican government had made a deal with him to keep the peace. That talk has now faded, and Attorney General Marisela Morales said in October Guzman would be captured “very soon.” North of the border, things have also turned sour for the fugitive trafficker, who made headlines as the world’s most wanted man after the death of Osama bin Laden

In last few weeks, U.S. authorities in Arizona announced details of raids in which they arrested over 200 people linked to the Sinaloa cartel, named for the northwestern Pacific state where Guzman was born, probably in 1957.

DRUG LORD PROTECTOR

Surveys show the public backs the crackdown on the cartels. But it also believes Calderon is losing the drug war. Alberto Vera, director of research at pollster Parametria, said only something of the magnitude of Guzman’s capture would persuade voters Calderon was winning.

That could boost support for his party by two or three points if it happened not long before the election, he added. “Catching him would do Calderon credit,” said Luis Pavan, 40, a Mexico City insurance agent. “Fighting the gangs is one of the few good things the government has done.” Weakened by the mounting death toll, Calderon’s PAN lags the opposition PRI by about 20 points, recent polls show.

Capturing Guzman could also benefit U.S. President Barack Obama, who faces a tough re-election battle against Republicans that accuse him of being weak on border security.

Arturo R. Garino, mayor of Nogales – an Arizona border city lying right on Guzman’s main smuggling routes – said the kingpin’s arrest would be a boost to both governments. “Cutting the head off the snake would help our economy too,” he said. Intelligence officials declined to say if efforts to catch Guzman had increased, but his biographer Malcolm Beith said there was little doubt they had, as recent operations on El Chapo’s turf were being conducted by crack military units. “It’s been special forces and marines to the best of my knowledge.

These guys are called in for special raids because they’re less likely to have been infiltrated,” he said. Officials who have tracked Guzman say it is one thing to locate him and quite another to capture him. Like late Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar, Guzman has a reputation as a protector of his heartland in Sinaloa, a rugged region that the state still struggles to penetrate, where news of approaching of strangers quickly reaches him and his followers. “Chapo has allegedly paid for schools, hospitals, and other public projects,” said Beith. “Second, he’s just about the only source of employment in parts of Sinaloa. And he has provided security of a sort. He’s been known to apprehend small-time crooks or thugs when they got out of hand. Lastly, the name Chapo pretty much puts the fear of God into people.” With locals watching his back, Guzman has always had just enough warning to get away at the last minute.

The exception was when soldiers captured him in Guatemala in June 1993.

New surveillance technology has raised the stakes though. 

Mexico has admitted allowing U.S. spy planes to track the cartels, reviving memories of the chase for Escobar, who was gunned down on a Medellin rooftop in December 1993. The U.S. Army’s spy unit Centra Spike played a crucial part in that takedown – using planes to triangulate Escobar’s phone calls – and U.S. surveillance drones stationed just across the Arizona border are likely being used to help catch Guzman. Adding to his problems are attacks from the rival Zetas gang, which has engaged in a spate of tit-for-tat killings with the Sinaloa cartel that have spread onto his territory. 

If Guzman is caught, it could unleash a bloody scramble for power before the election, said Jose Luis Pineyro, a security expert at Mexico’s Autonomous Metropolitan University.

“He is said to have influence in five continents,” he said. “It would have repercussions outside Mexico and America.”

Related articles

 
1 Comment

Posted by on 01/06/2012 in Crime!, Mexican Drug Cartels

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Kinsmen of El Chapo Murdered in Sinaloa

The bodies of two male murder victims were found Thursday morning in the small community of Aguaruto located in the municipality of Culiacan on the highway to the neighboring city of Navolato.
Both men had been executed elsewhere before their bodies were dumped in Aguaruto.

The Sinaloa Attorney General’s office identified the men as Juan Guzmán Rocha “El Juancho” , reported to be either a first cousin or nephew of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman and José Miguel Bastidas Manjarrez “El Guero Bastidas”, reported to be a member of Los Antrax, a group of Sinaloa cartel hit men.

Guzman Rocha may be the same person named: FIRST NAME UNKNOWN, LAST NAME UNKNOWN, a/k/a “Juancho” in the same indictment under which Vicente Zambada Niebla “El Vicentillo” is being prosecuted in a Chicago federal district court.

El chapo's cousins murdered!

El chapo's cousins murdered!

 
Comments Off on Kinsmen of El Chapo Murdered in Sinaloa

Posted by on 12/17/2011 in Crime!

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Old news- New twist- U.S. Prosecutor claims!

 

Fire is speaking!

Fire is speaking!

Leaders of the Sinaloa drug cartel wanted to buy powerful U.S. military weapons to “blow up” government buildings in Mexico after the arrest of a top alleged kingpin, U.S. prosecutors claimed in court documents.

U.S. prosecutors filed the document Nov. 10 in connection with the pending trial in Chicago of Jesus Vicente Zambada-Niebla, who was arrested by Mexican officials in 2009 and extradited to the United States in 2010. Officials allege in the documents that Zambada-Niebla is a high-ranking member of the Sinaloa drug cartel led by Joaquin “Chapo” Guzman-Loera .

The Sinaloa drug cartel has been at war with the Juárez drug cartel to take over the drug trade in the El Paso area. Its battle against the Vicente Carrillo Fuentes drug cartel killed an estimated 9,100 people in Juárez between Jan. 1, 2008 and Oct. 31.

The court documents also identify German Olivares as Guzman’s coordinator for the Juárez smuggling corridor. Zambada-Niebla’s lawyers — some based in Tucson, New York and other areas — claim a “public authority” defense, alleging that U.S. authorities allowed Zambada-Niebla to traffic tons of cocaine and heroin into the United States in exchange for information about rival drug cartels.

His defense lawyers also sought to prevent government prosecutors from using the Classified Information Protection Act to exclude certain records and witness information that may threaten U.S. national security.

According to a conversation recorded by Margarito Flores, a cooperating witness, “Guzman-Loera and Ismael Zambada-Garcia (Zambada-Niebla’s father) discussed the recent arrest of Zambada-Garcia’s brother, Jesus Zambada-Garcia É by Mexican authorities.”

“This government is letting the gringos (American law enforcement) do whatever they want,” Zambada-Garcia said according to Flores. 

Then, Guzman said, “They are (expletive) us everywhere. What are we going to do?”

Guzman, whom Interpol has listed as one of the world’s most-wanted fugitives, added, “Let it be a government building, it doesn’t matter whose. An embassy or a consulate, a media outlet or television station (attack a Mexican or U.S. government or media building in Mexico City).”

 
Comments Off on Old news- New twist- U.S. Prosecutor claims!

Posted by on 11/28/2011 in Crime!

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

 
Mobile biz

The place to purchase Mobile Applications etc.,

Matt on Not-WordPress

Stuff and things.

bizatjango

BizJango & Jazz Music go together!

Essa On Everything

***Warning: Posts on this site may be factually incorrect, delusional, mean spirited...or all of the above

%d bloggers like this: